Does Your Website Follow “The Iron Law of Marketing?”

Many websites unwittingly ignore ‘The Iron Law’ of Marketing. They begin by explaining features about the company, e.g. how long they’ve been in business, what their premises look like, etc. The truth is that most visitors to your website couldn’t give a hoot about the features of your company! What they primarily care about is WIIFM.

WIIFM stands for ‘What’s In It For Me’. It’s ‘The Iron Law of Marketing’. Unless visitors to your website can quickly see what your business can do for them, the chances are that they’ll be gone quickly, typically in seconds. Once they’re gone, they’re gone – probably never to return.

WIIFM – ‘What’s in it for me’. Are we really so self-centred? Well, yes, I’m afraid that we are. Please don’t feel guilty – it’s just the way we’re hard-wired. Sure, farther down the line, we care about others. But, first and foremost, we’re concerned about how we survive and thrive. That’s simple evolutionary common sense.

If you want your visitor to stay on your website, you need to heed ‘The Iron Law of Marketing’. You need to give your visitors WIIFM – ‘What’s in it for me’. But the paradox is this: the ‘me’ shouldn’t be you (i.e. your premises, etc). It should be them – your visitors.

You need to put yourself in your visitors’ shoes and address what they’re interested in, what they might want, how you may be able to help them.

Most companies are concerned to get ‘targeted traffic’ (i.e. potential clients to their sites) through SEO (Search Engine Optimisation) and other clever stuff. And this is important – very important indeed.

But if most of your prospective clients leave your website in a few seconds, isn’t that just a little bit silly? (And we’ve all done it, me too!) Isn’t that rather like filling a bucket with water… which just runs out of all the holes in the bottom?

It’s not rocket science! We simply need to show visitors to our websites the benefits of doing business with us. And we need to do it in a fun, interesting manner.

If possible, we should pack our websites with ‘FREE gifts’, so that visitors derive immediate benefit. One of the most valued gifts is FREE information which you give to your visitors and which will help them.

I’m amazed when I see websites created and run by people ten times more clever than me… yet doomed to failure because they broke ‘The Iron Law of Marketing’ – WIIFM, ‘What’s In It For Me’.

Often it just needs a change in focus and some alterations for your website to be much more successful. If you disregard WIIFM, it will become your worst enemy. If you take heed, it will become your best friend.

Mobile Phone Accessories – Can You Easily Get What You’re After?

Today the mobile phone has become a necessity of modern life. In fact it has become so much a part of life that one can not imagine living without it. With the increased demand for mobile phones the need for appropriate accessories has also increased.

Types of mobile phone accessories

There are several kinds of mobile phone accessories. You can buy a wide range of mobile phone chargers, pouches, speakers, hands-free car kits, batteries, sim cards, screen protectors and memory cards, as well as many others. There are also a wide range of data cables available to ensure easier transfer of data for the discerning mobile phone user. You can also purchase a wide range of Bluetooth accessories such as Bluetooth headsets, hands-free Bluetooth car kits as well as other accessories.

Availability of accessories

For many users finding access to the right mobile phone accessories can mean having to browse many different websites to find the suitable kit. For example if you wish to buy a charger for a particular handset then you may not find it at every online mobile phone store. Most mobile chargers only work for a specific model or brand, so chances are you will need to buy the exact charger for your mobile phone. However, there are many online sites dealing in accessories which have a comprehensive selection and easy to use "product selectors" to help customers. You can buy everything from protective pouches to chargers or even Bluetooth accessories, all under one roof! Many sites will offer complementary accessories, especially if the mobile phone you've bought is a new or expensive model. Make sure you shop around to get the best deals!

5 Quick Ways To Make Money From Home

With today's economy being what it is, somewhat stagnant; many people are trying very hard to come up with ways to make money from home. The unemployed, the recently downsized, even the retired grandmother need to find ways to earn money from home. Here are a few quick ways to make money from home.

1. Blogging

First, if you are seeking quick ways to make money, and you are a knowledgeable individual, you can start your own blog. The blog needs to be of interest to the public, and some of the blog programs on the internet today allow you to monetize your blog right away. To monetize your blog means to link it to one of the many advertising programs out there. These programs pay you for every click on the ads they place on your blog page or pages.

2. Writing Articles For Online Directories

Another of the quick ways to make money from home is article writing. There are many sites online which offer the opportunity to write about a variety of subjects. Some pay a penny per word, others pay substantially more. Most will base what you are paid on the level of your writing skill. Many will grade several of your articles to determine your average skill level. On these sites, research of the chosen subject is your friend and can lead to higher author ranking, which leads to higher per-word rates. You can see your earnings really add up.

3. Author Your Own Informational Articles

Then there are other sites, think of them as author sites, that allow you to create your own material on whiche subject you choose-complete with pictures or videos should you decide to include them-and that that will then add your approved articles to their directories . These sites pay for page views and advertising clicks, too. You also earn whenever someone downloads one of your articles to use on their blog or other web page. This is another of the quick ways to make money, but not as fast as others.

4. Online Auctions

Then there are those auction sites where you place items for sale. These are some of the quickest ways to make money. People shop online all the time. All you need is a product or some individual items to sell, pictures of these items to upload, a decent description, and decent pricing for the product and for shipping. If you offer decent items at decent prices and shipping rates, you are sure to make some money.

5. Create Your Own Website or Webstore

Make your own online business, either from some online franchise with its own products, or sell your own products or services. If you are a professional writer or transcriptionist, you can help potential clients find your site by placing links on pages or sites you visit regularly yourself. Or open your own online "dollar-type" store.

Privacy Issues Surrounding Biometric Technology

The terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center have provoked in-depth discussion and study of existing security measures, their deficiencies, and how to enhance security to prevent similar terrorist attacks from occurring in the future. Biometric technology has risen to the top of the list as a possible solution. The government is not the only entity exploring biometric security systems. The financial services industry see biometrics as a way to curb identity theft. Biometrics are intrinsic physical characteristics used to identify individuals. The most commonly used biometric is fingerprints but others include, handprints, facial features, iris & retinal scans, and voice recognition.

Soon after 9/11 there were calls for the issuance of national ID cards containing biometric information on an RFID chip implanted on the card. The argument is that national ID cards will increase security by identifying individuals with their unique fingerprints which are much more difficult to counterfeit than standard photo ID cards. There is also a movement toward biometric passports. It looks like biometric passports are coming soon. National ID cards may follow.

Biometric identification is nothing new. Humans have been identifying other humans biometrically since the beginning of time. You recognize people you know by their facial features, their voice, and other biometric features. What’s new is introducing technology into the mix that compares a given biometric with a stored database of biometrics to verify the identity of an individual. An individual place their finger on a fingerprint scanner and the image is compared with the database to verify the person’s identity. Promising as it is, biometric technology has not been without hiccups but biometrics are advancing quickly and becoming more and more prevalent in security systems.

Fingerprints are the most commonly used biometric identifiers. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) conducted a study that showed single fingerprint biometric systems had a 98.6 percent accuracy rate. The accuracy rate rose to 99.6 percent when 2 fingerprints were used and an almost perfect 99.9 percent when 4 or more fingerprints were used. The study results show that biometric identification is nearly perfect which is not surprising given the uniqueness of human fingerprints.

The US-VISIT program, which is an acronym for United States Visitor & Immigrant Status Indicator Technology, currently requires foreign visitors to the US to present a biometric passport containing 2 fingerprints and a digital photo for identification purposes before being granted admission to the U.S. Of course the biometrics are compared against a vast network of government databases full of known and suspected terrorists and other criminals.

On the surface biometric technology may sound like a panacea but it’s use has raised significant privacy concerns that need to be addressed. Here are six major privacy concerns: storage, vulnerability, confidence, authenticity, linking, and ubiquity.

Critics wonder how the data will be stored and how vulnerable it will be to theft or abuse. Confidence issues center around the implications of false positives and false negatives. Can the biometric data be used to link to other information about the individual such as marital status, religion, employment status, etc.? And finally ubiquity. What are the implications of leaving electronic “bread crumbs” to mark a trail detailing every movement an individual makes?

Until these issues are addressed, privacy advocates will lead a charge to resist biometric technology claiming it as a way for the government to assume a “Big Brother” type of rule as described in George Orwell’s novel 1984. But protest as they may, it’s likely national security concerns and the ability of biometric systems to enhance the security of US border and possibly prevent another major terrorist attack will win out over privacy concerns.